Stimpy Lockjaw’s Stimpy Lockjaw Reviewed

Stimpy Lockjaw is a band that plays prog/jazz fusion/math rock. They are based out of New York, and this is a self-titled, self-released album. I think all the members have other projects, so they are a “supergroup” of sorts. It is really hard to pin down too much else. Their site is fairly non-descriptive. For example, the About Us section says, “We’re a little band called Stimpy Lockjaw. Please buy things.”

The first track has an old school math rock feel to it. I used to listen to Don Caballero a lot, and this track brings back nostalgia for that time. It starts with a short two note rhythmic idea (which is actually a bit more embellished than the actual motif later). The whole song is very minimalist with passing this small concept around the band.

The beginning maybe feels a bit too repetitive and strives too much to have a modern djent sound to it. Once the song gets going it gets better. The idea morphs all over into jazzy sections with a fretless bass, female vocal singing neutral syllables, and some soloing that sounds improvised. But my guess is that it is actually composed.

The second half of the track puts the rhythmic idea into the bass, and slowly starts building up a lot of tension by adding more and more layers. Despite the repetition, I think this succeeds on all fronts of keeping the song interesting and having a lot of forward momentum. The song dissolves at one point into piano nothingness, only to start back up a little slower and a lot dirtier with the distortion on the guitar and the tonality starting to fall apart.

The composition is amazing on this first track, but after having listened to the whole album many times, it is my least favorite. The basic idea described here is how all of the other songs progress. The other songs are far less minimalist and repetitive, though. The second track starts the motif, and already the idea to be passed around is more complicated than most parts of the first track. They also never again bring the djent sound into the songs.

Track two has more of a jazz combo feel to it. There is a saxophone that makes an appearance several times. Despite the complexity, the drumming has a more traditional feel keeping time rather than imitating a rhythmic idea that the rest of the band is doing. I’m also less sure about the composed vs improv aspects of this track. There are solos that really feel improvised. I think if I only heard the first track I may not have stuck this band out, but this second track is the type of jazz/metal combo that I really loved in T.R.A.M. and is extremely hard to find anywhere.

The third track is their “single” from the album that was released for promotional purposes and will be at the end of the post. It is the first track to have vocals that have lyrics. It also feels much more like a prog metal song than the jazz combo of the previous track. Once the opening is done, they set up a piano ostinato and build the next section of the song on top of it, and impressively pass that complicated material to the guitar. This is excellent technical playing.

None of the repetitive sections are that long in comparison with the song as a whole, but I still think this track also suffers a little from how excessive the repetition is. They do a really good job of coming up with ways to keep it changing with instrumentation, style changes, and forward momentum. I foresee the repetition making a large number of repeat listens more tedious. The second half frees up the form with the jazzy soloing again, so if you listen to it, make sure you get that far to hear the type of stuff that appears on other tracks.

The fourth track is half atmospheric, but builds into a full band climax and embellishes with some chromatic runs. The song is fine, but somewhat forgettable in comparison with the rest of the album. The last track also starts as atmospheric sounds, but this one develops into a down tempo experiment with chords. This first half has a different feel to the rest of the album. By the end, they go into their standard mode of passing around a technical ostinato.

I really love this closer, because I think they strike a better balance with the repetition, countermelodies, and chord progressions. When it dissolves back down, they even do some interesting rhythmic things like putting the bass drum “downbeat” a sixteenth note past the true downbeat.

Overall, this is the type of album I’ve been waiting all year for. In my opinion, it is well worth checking out. I give it a 9/10. Here’s a sample:

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3 thoughts on “Stimpy Lockjaw’s Stimpy Lockjaw Reviewed

  1. david says:

    Checking this out. I hear Simmon Phillips (Jazz fusion legend) here too, more than just “Math Rock” (what is this? like Virgil Donati’s projects?). It sounds like a more purposeful version of Hiromi Uehara’s Trio. I guess because there is more of an art rock core thinking taken here, rather than the (I think) pointless jazz attitude of just playing things that “feel good”.

  2. Tim says:

    I just wanted to say that this is a lot of fun to listen to. And a badass name.

  3. Dave says:

    I love that album, but oddly enough I don’t feel compelled to spin it again, maybe it’s the musical mood I’m in at the moment, but maybe it’s something deeper.

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